A New Generation of Designers Chooses Anonymity

Lazaro Hernandez, left, and Jack McCollough of Proenza Schouler. AGNES DHERBEYS FOR THE NEW YORK TIMES
Lazaro Hernandez, left, and Jack McCollough of Proenza Schouler. AGNES DHERBEYS FOR THE NEW YORK TIMES
Lazaro Hernandez, left, and Jack McCollough of Proenza Schouler.
AGNES DHERBEYS FOR THE NEW YORK TIMES

“But increasingly those born during the Halston-Saint Laurent heyday or after are teaming up and taking cover under names that obscure their own — inspired, perhaps, by the success, since their founding in 2002, of both Proenza Schouler, the brand of Lazaro Hernandez and Jack McCollough that’s a conjoining of their mothers’ maiden names, and the Alice in Chains-redolent Rag & Bone, a.k.a. David Neville and Marcus Wainwright.”

“Indeed, if there’s any conclusion that can be drawn from perusing the current crowded roster of shows (other than “this is madness”), it’s that anonymity and its fey cousin, abstraction, are all the rage.”

Read more on the designers behind the brand names on The New York Times.

We particularly admire designers who can physically remove themselves from the brand name. It makes it more about the clothes, the detail, and the tireless hours taken to produce a collection; which we believe make it that more worthwhile. Designers whose names are the forefront of their brands do tend to get a lot more air-time as opposed to their lesser know equals and egos can be blown up to the point of no return. Even though it may give a better narrative and make designers like Micahel Kors, Marc Jacobs and Karl Lagerfeld more relatable, at the end of the day we’re not really interested in their private lives.